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Creating or Exploring Stylised Drama

Availability: In stock.

£35.00

Quick Overview

This new photocopiable pack of articles will provide students with much inspiration and theory which they can apply to their own devised pieces, or apply to a stylised play they are studying. Teachers often look for materials that will challenge and extend students' studies-this product is one such example. The articles will ensure that students use original and complex ideas within their studies and will help to show students how they can demonstrate originality and depth when analysing or discussing stylised drama. Whether using them as student handouts, independent reading homeworks, or just as an aid to help planning lessons, these articles, with accompanying revision questions will ensure that you cover a wide range of drama movements and names when exploring any stylised piece of drama.


When creating or studying stylised drama, A Level students should have an understanding of the style and the intentions behind it. This series of photocopiable articles will help students to approach a piece of stylised drama from many different angles. From looking at the political intentions behind stylised production methods through to the absurd and existential.
The articles have been designed to help your students show complexity and thorough subject knowledge within their studies. They are great to use as a series of independent homework readings to help students to learn more about the different approaches and intentions within stylised drama. Students could arrive at the lesson with a wealth of knowledge, ready to discuss it and apply it to the stylised drama they are exploring or creating.
The articles are aimed at the more able student and look at a variety of topics such as: the relationship between design and performance in stylised drama, drawing upon theories from Appia and Wagner; or looking at how stylised drama often tries to achieve neutrality on the stage drawing upon the expressionist work of Artaud, Berkoff and Brecht. One article encourages students to consider the power of the non-verbal in stylised drama and considers how directors such as Meyerhold and Peter Brook use aspects such as silence or pauses to create a language more powerful than words. Another article focuses upon how expressionism has influenced stylised drama. Drawing upon names such as Buchner and Strindberg it considers the legacy expressionism has left within our modern theatre and looks at how many modern day theatre directors are still using expressionist techniques such as fragmentation, symbols and dream-like spaces etc. Another article focuses upon the physical within stylised theatre and explores how the great masters of physical drama such as Lecoq, Meyerhold, Gaulier and Brook utilised movement within their stylised work and the impact this has had upon modern companies such as Forkbeard Fantasy or Theatre de Complicite.