Skip to Store Area:

My Cart

You have no items in your shopping cart.

More Views

Creating or Exploring Naturalistic Drama

Availability: In stock.

£35.00

Quick Overview

A must if you are teaching a play by Ibsen, or indeed any other naturalistic playwright.
If A Level students are either creating or studying naturalistic or realistic drama, this photocopoable pack is for them. The series of interesting and challenging articles will lead them to understand exactly what naturalistic drama is, where it has evolved from and how it can be achieved.
This new photocopiable pack of articles will provide students with much inspiration and theory which they can apply to their own devised pieces, or apply to a naturalistic play they are studying. Teachers often look for materials that will challenge and extend students' studies-this product is one such example. The articles will ensure that students use original and complex ideas within their studies and will help to show students how they can demonstrate originality and depth when analysing or discussing naturalistic drama. Whether using them as student handouts, independent reading homeworks, or just as an aid to help planning lessons, these articles, with accompanying revision questions will ensure that you cover a wide range of drama movements and names when exploring any naturalistic piece of drama.


The articles in this pack look at the many different aims and intentions a director may have for using naturalism and will draw upon some of the most famous names associated with the style: Zola, Antoine, Ibsen and Stanislavski to name but a few. They explore how naturalism is still used in modern drama and consider the effect it can have upon audiences. The articles cover a range of aspects, such as encouraging students to look at how naturalism has developed since its origins; how it has attempted to reflect the world and incorporate scientific discoveries and theological understandings. The articles encourage students to go well beyond looking at naturalism as just something associated with Stanislavski and seeks to show them how to apply names such as Darwin, Marx, Zola, Antoine and Compte into their discussions of a naturalistic piece of drama. The articles consider how Stanislavski and the Moscow Art Theatre emerged from this movement and how Stanislavski then went on to develop the ideas of his predecessors, taking the likes of Zola's ideas and transforming them further so that they have had a lasting legacy into today's theatre. The articles consider the work of great naturalistic playwrights such as Chekhov, Strindberg or Ibsen and consider how naturalistic characters are created and the implications this has on a performance; considering how often naturalistic characters are determined and shaped by their environments. Another article considers how stage design and acting approaches should compliment each other and will have need to work together in a piece of naturalistic drama.

The articles will ensure that students use original and complex ideas within their studies and will help to show students how they can demonstrate originality and depth when analysing or discussing naturalistic drama. Whether using them as student handouts, independent reading homeworks, or just as an aid to help planning lessons, these articles, with accompanying revision questions will ensure that you cover a wide range of drama movements and names when exploring any piece of naturalistic drama.